Category Archives: Campaigns

Police and public in red light tussle – Cyprus Mail

THE police have adamantly denied accusations from the public that drivers are being fined for offences they did not commit for the sake of meeting internal quotas, especially when conducting high-profile road safety campaigns.

In the space of one week last month, the Sunday Mail received complaints from several readers claiming they had been wrongly fined for traffic offences.

Two different men were fined in Germasogia, Limassol at two traffic lights close to each other for running a red light – charges they both deny.

One of them, Robert Michael, a 70-year-old retired British policeman who had worked in London, said he was absolutely perplexed by the fact he was fined when the light was very much green when he passed it.

“I braked as I approached the traffic lights just in case they would go amber but they were still green. I continued to drive on and a policeman pulled me over to say I had passed with a red light,” he told the Sunday Mail.

“I’m an ex policeman from London. I don’t break the law. If it was justified I certainly wouldn’t dispute it.”

An old photograph of Robert Michael who was involved in the security of former President Demetris Christofias when he visited the UK

Michael said he began disputing the case with the police officer on scene and when Michael told him he was willing to take the case to court, the officer allegedly responded with “you can try but we always win.”

Cases such as these are always very difficult to prove or dispute.

Unlike London, which is covered with cameras and CCTV, in Cyprus a court case would be the word of one man against that of an officer.

“In the UK I would have a shot at justice but not in this country,” Fields said.

“I had children in the car, so of course I was driving carefully.”

On the same day, a friend of Fields, Egis Rukviza also got stopped at a nearby set of traffic lights in Germasogia for what he was told at the scene was running a red light.

Rukviza has been living in Cyprus with his wife Neringa for the past seven years after they moved from Lithuania and says in all his time here he had never once been fined.

Due to Rukviza’s broken English, his wife spoke on his behalf to the Sunday Mail “my husband stopped at the traffic lights because it was red and there was another car in front of him. Then it became green and they drove on. Police didn’t stop the first car. It was an expensive one, so they didn’t bother, but they stopped my husband.

“I know my husband, he drives very carefully,” Neringa said.

According to their account, once pulled over, the police officer called on a colleague of his – who was sitting in the car – to write up the fine.

“He didn’t even see what happened. My husband kept insisting it was green,” she said.

Later that evening, the couple went to the police station to complain and ask for proof of the offence – they were told there were no CCTV cameras.

Police spokesman Andreas Angelides said the difficulty with such complaints is that there is hardly ever any evidence – unlike those that are caught speeding with the use of a radar – and it was the word of one person against another.

“We also have to keep in mind that the person being fined might be overreacting,” and perhaps falsely denying the charge, Angelides told the Sunday Mail.

Police’s campaigns are aimed to clamp down on bad drivers not an attempt to give out tickets left, right and centre, he added.

On August 29, in a one-day campaign, 259 people were booked in Limassol alone between 8am to 5pm.

Of those, 78 were booked running a red light while 82 were caught using a mobile phone while driving.

“I don’t mind these campaigns. I think they’re great. But you can’t fine innocent people as a source of income,” Michael said.

There are three courses of action available for people to follow when they feel they have been wronged – send a letter to the chief of police, take the case to court, or speak to the local traffic police supervisor.

If there is a case of bad police behaviour, then the public can also file a report to the independent authority for the investigation of allegations and complaints against the police.

Michael and Rukviza however tried – and were rebuffed twice – when they tried to speak to Limassol traffic police, they said.

After they discovered they had both been fined, they headed to the Germasogia police station asking to speak to the traffic supervisor. They were advised to go the next day.

The following day however the supervisor was apparently still unavailable to meet them and sent out the police officer that fined Rukviza.

Upon closer inspection Rukviza also realised that although his supposed offence was running a red light, the ticket said he had been driving while on his phone – an offence he also denies.

“The officer, when he came out to meet my husband and Mr Robert (Michael) at the station, then insisted they had driven past a red light,” Neringa said.

“So they asked him why the ticket was for driving while using a mobile phone and he said ‘you committed both but I fined you only for one’.”

Rukviza was considering filing a report over the police officer but said “they all work together. I don’t think a complaint would even make it to the policeman’s file. I doubt they even have a file.”

Angelides told the Sunday Mail that under no circumstances do police have quotas of fines that have to be filled.

“On the contrary, officers are told that if they’re not sure about an offence – say someone was caught for speeding but they weren’t sure if the person was wearing a seatbelt – then to ignore the seatbelt offence,” he said.

“Over the years, the behaviour of the police force has improved as well and the way they respond to the public. Many times the officers are on the receiving end of abuse from people that are upset about being fined who start shouting and swearing.”

All of which is no doubt true, but is of little solace to Michael and Rukviza. Both men paid their €85 fines, but feel it is unjust, as they insist they didn’t commit the offences.

“If I’d done it, of course I’d pay,” Fields said.

[…]

Source: Police and public in red light tussle – Cyprus Mail

Cops in seat belt and child safety seat clampdown – in-cyprus.com

Traffic police across Cyprus will be conducting a nationwide clampdown on motorists and vehicle passengers without seat belts this week.

Apart from seat belt checks, police will also be looking to see if children are properly seated in child seats.

The campaign – which is part of a wider European initiative by the European Traffic Police Network (TISPOL) – will run until September 17 across the island.

The aim of the campaign is lower the risk of injuries and road fatalities by motorists and passengers not using seat belts. Officers will also be checking to see if children are properly fastened inside the cars.

According to police figures, 62.6% of road fatalities were due to drivers and passengers not being properly fastened.

Source: Cops in seat belt and child safety seat clampdown – in-cyprus.com

Police to launch week-long campaign on using phones while driving – Cyprus Mail

Police said on Sunday they would be conducting a week-long road safety campaign to clamp down on phone use by drivers. The campaign begins on Monday and will run until September 10. “

“As is well known while using a phone results in the driver’s attention being distracted,” an announcement said, adding that such actions greatly contribute to increasing the likelihood of a road traffic collision.

 “At European level, modern surveys show that between 10% and 30% of all road traffic collisions are caused by distracted drivers. Mobile phone use plays a key role in this.”

Source: Police to launch week-long campaign on using phones while driving – Cyprus Mail

Most Cyprus lorries and buses fail traffic standards – in-cyprus.com

Major traffic police inspections have unveiled that most of the buses and lorries in Cyprus are in violation of traffic regulations

According to the latest figures, one in three lorries that were stopped for inspections were cited for various violations while the situation was more dire for buses which found most of them to have violated a traffic law in one shape or form.

The major campaign between July 24 and 30 in Cyprus was part of a wider European initiative by the European Traffic Police Network (TISPOL).

A total of 776 heavy vehicles were inspected out of which 305 were cited. A total of 104 inspections were made on buses during which 84 were cited for various violations while 672 lorries were inspected out of which 222 were cited for various violations.

Source: Most Cyprus lorries and buses fail traffic standards – in-cyprus.com

Minister: multidimensional strategy aims to cut road accidents – Cyprus Mail

The justice ministry has a multidimensional strategy aimed at the prevention of traffic accidents, minister Ionas Nicolaou said on Saturday. Speaking at the launch of a campaign aimed at providing free training to new drivers of large motorbikes, Nicolaou said a study has also been commissioned on the implementation of a new communication strategy on […]

Source: Minister: multidimensional strategy aims to cut road accidents – Cyprus Mail

Police across Europe in 24-hour ‘speed enforcement’ marathon – Cyprus Mail

Police officers across Europe are making ready for their latest “Speed Marathon”, taking place from 6am on Wednesday 6am on Thursday. The 24-hour initiative forms part of TISPOL’s speed enforcement operation, running until April 23. Cyprus is a member of TISPOL – the European Traffic Police Network – but police here have yet to announce […]

Source: Police across Europe in 24-hour ‘speed enforcement’ marathon – Cyprus Mail

Week-long clampdown on drunk driving from Monday – Cyprus Mail

Police will on Monday begin a week-long campaign to clampdown on drink driving, they said on Sunday. In a brief announcement they said driving under the influence of alcohol remained one of the main causes of fatal road collisions. Also as of Monday, the police traffic department will roll out its new automatic number plate […]

Source: Week-long clampdown on drunk driving from Monday – Cyprus Mail

Police say they booked almost 10,000 speeders in January, plus nearly 12,000 for other traffic offences – Cyprus Mail

Police Tuesday made public the results of their continued action against crime with a number of coordinated operations carried out throughout January, saying they booked 9,562 drivers for speeding along with another 11,868 for other offences. “In the context of crime fighting, its prevention and the entrenchment of a sense of security in the public, […]

Source: Police say they booked almost 10,000 speeders in January, plus nearly 12,000 for other traffic offences – Cyprus Mail