Category Archives: Press

Rules issued for car imports from UK post-Brexit | Cyprus Mail

The road transport department announced on Tuesday the rules concerning the importation of vehicles from the UK following its EU exit.

According to the department, an M1 category vehicle – passenger car with up to eight seats not including the driver – can be registered in Cyprus provided it is up to five-years-old on the date of arrival, counting from the date it had been registered new in any country.

This does not apply to M1 vehicles already transported or imported to Cyprus from the UK, but not yet registered, or will be loaded for shipping to the Republic by Monday, February 15.

These vehicles can be registered whenever, even if its age exceeds five years.

The department said to register, an M1 vehicle must be accompanied by the original registration certificate (V5c) from the UK, a valid Cypriot MOT, an EU Whole Vehicle Type-Approval (Wvta) or Single Vehicle Approval (SVA) in Cyprus.

A UK registration certificate issued by the end of last year constitutes adequate proof that the vehicle has Wvta, provided it bears the Wvta indication. The indication on the V5c is found at point K – Type of approval number – and is in the form of e.g e4*2007/46*0186*11.

If there is no such indication, to register the vehicle, it must receive the SVA in Cyprus.

Vehicles in the M2 and M3 categories (buses) and N1, N2, and N3 cargo transporters (vans, twin cabs, trucks) are registered irrespective of age, provided they have certification proving their emissions comply with EU standards on the date the vehicle was registered in any country for the first time and they are equipped with ABS.

The UK registration certificate issued by the end of the year is again considered adequate proof as concerns emissions provided the engine is the one stated in the document. If it is a different engine, the department wants a certificate that its emissions comply with the respective EU standards.

Category L vehicles – mopeds, motorcycles, tricycles, and quad bikes – will be registered irrespective of age, provided they are accompanied by the European certificate of conformity in force on the date of its first registration. The department also accepts a copy of the certificate issued by the manufacturer or their representative.

The department also accepts the UK registration certificate issued by the end of the year, which is considered adequate proof that the vehicle has Wvta, provided the document bears the approval of the type of vehicle.

Source: Rules issued for car imports from UK post-Brexit | Cyprus Mail

Fixed airport taxi fares from March 1 | Cyprus Mail

ΕΠ' ΑΟΡΙΣΤΟΝ ΑΠΕΡΓΙΑ ΟΔΗΓΟΙ ΤΑΞΙ ΣΤΟ ΑΕΡΟΔΡΟΜΙΟ ΛΑΡΝΑΚΑΣ The transport ministry has set fixed fares for taxis travelling to and from the airports, starting on March 1.

The fares include urban and rural taxi services.

In a written statement on Friday, Transport Minister Yiannis Karousos called on taxi drivers to implement the newly set fares “as one of the steps taken to improve the taxi transport sector in Cyprus”.

The decision aimed to solve a longstanding problem mainly concerning the appropriate information of visitors, tourists and others who use the service.

“The establishment of fixed fares is expected to give credibility to taxi transport thus improving professionalism and increase passenger traffic,” the ministry said.

According to the ministry no driver is allowed to charge lower or higher than those rates.

 

Taxis carrying up to 4 passengers Taxis carrying 5 – 6  

passengers

FromToDay PriceNight PriceDay PriceNight Price
(06.00 – 20.30)(20.30 – 06.00)(06.00 – 20.30)(20.30 – 06.00)
Larnaca AirportNicosia€ 45€ 50€ 60€ 65
Limassol€ 50€ 60€ 65€ 80
Larnaca€ 15€ 20€ 20€ 25
Protaras€ 55€ 65€ 70€ 85
Ayia Napa€ 50€ 60€ 65€ 80
Pissouri€ 80€ 95€ 105€ 125
Paphos, Peyia€ 100€ 120€ 130€ 155
Polis, Argaka, Pomos€ 130€ 150€ 170€ 195
Troodos Area€ 85€ 100€ 110€ 130
Pyrgos Tyllirias€ 160€ 190€ 210€ 245
Paphos AirportNicosia€ 110€ 130€ 145€ 170
Limassol€ 50€ 60€ 65€ 80
Larnaca€ 100€ 120€ 130€ 155
Famagusta Area€ 130€ 150€ 170€ 195
Paphos, Peyia€ 20€ 25€ 25€ 35
Polis, Argakas, Pomos€ 45€ 50€ 60€ 65
Troodos Area€ 55€ 65€ 70€ 85
Pyrgos Tyllirias€ 75€ 85€ 95€ 110

The above fixed fares include the cost of luggage carriage as well as the VAT. Fixed fares also apply on public holidays.

Source: Fixed airport taxi fares from March 1 | Cyprus Mail

Road tax renewals to start on January 7 | Cyprus Mail

Road tax renewals for 2021 will start on January 7, the road transport department said on Wednesday.

The last date for renewals is March 11, 2021. After that date there will be a surcharge.

The road tax can be renewed for a period of three, six, nine or 12 months, it added.

Vehicles must have an MOT and insurance.

The department urged owners to renew their road tax in time and not to wait until the last minute to avoid potentially overloading he system which could lead to inconvenience.

All vehicle owners who had renewed their road tax in 2020 but do not intend to do so for 2021 must notify the department that they are immobilising their vehicle by completing form TOM12B. Failure to do so will mean the fee remains outstanding.

Vehicles for which the road tax was not renewed in 2020 and have not been declared as immobilised will be struck off the department’s registry unless the outstanding sum is paid and the road tax renewed by Thursday, March 11, 2021.

In the event that a vehicle has been scrapped, an application (form TOM98A) and a certificate to that effect issued by authorised facilities, must be submitted to the department so that the owner is no longer liable to pay road tax.

Road tax can be renewed throughout the year online, at banks, citizens’ help centres, district post offices and district offices of the road transport department of the transport ministry.
Owners will not be sent notifications to renew their road tax, the department also said.
Source: Road tax renewals to start on January 7 | Cyprus Mail

New setback for traffic cams system | Cyprus Mail

Thirteen years after the national traffic camera network was dismantled, efforts to resuscitate the project suffered further setback as companies challenged the tender process.
The contract was finally awarded last month to US-based Conduent State and Local Solutions Inc, which submitted an offer of just over €34m.
The tender is for 90 fixed cameras to monitor red-light and stop-sign violations, as well as for speeding, with a further 20 mobile units to be deployed by the police during specific campaigns or in rural areas.
But this week, the four unsuccessful companies all issued appeals to the tender review authority – a move which could potentially clog up works for months if not years.
A transport ministry official told the Cyprus Mail that the matter should be clarified next week, with a meeting set to take place on Monday.
The authority could put the project on hold to review the matter further or it may give the green light for the winning company to go ahead.
But the companies could ultimately try and take the case all the way to the courts.
And to make matters even more complicated, transport minister Yiannis Karousos said on Thursday that his department would issue an objection if a suspension order is given.
While the traffic camera issue has been on the backburner for years, it has recently re-emerged as a potentially vital tool by the government to reduce road fatalities.
Cyprus also ranks as one of the highest countries in the EU as regards road deaths per head of the population.
Along with an overhaul of the driving offences fines on October 1, authorities are hopeful that stricter measures in force on the roads will improve public safety.
The road transport department carried out a study in September which found that 70 per cent of road deaths in Cyprus occur within built-up areas. This far exceeds the EU average of 35 per cent.

Source: New setback for traffic cams system | Cyprus Mail

Return of traffic cameras moving closer | Cyprus Mail

Two bills regulating fines for road violations caught on speed cameras have been submitted to the House of Representatives for approval.

Last July, 13 years after the national traffic camera network was dismantled due to a series of technical and legal issues, the government invited tenders for a new system seen as critical to efforts to stem the bloodshed on the roads.

Five bidders from Cyprus, Europe and the US submitted final tenders for the installation and operation of the cameras, which are expected to be up and running by the end of 2020.

According to media reports on Wednesday, the contract was awarded to US-based Conduent State and Local Solutions Inc, which submitted an offer of just over €34m.

The tender is for 90 fixed cameras to monitor red light and stop sign violations, as well as for speeding, with a further 20 mobile units to be deployed by the police during specific campaigns or in rural areas.

The two bills, which must be approved by House of Representatives before they come into force, outline the general regulations concerning procedural issues, such as how the out of court fines will be sent and paid, as well as other legal issues that are expected to arise once the speed cameras are fully operational.

Police and non-governmental organisations over the years have repeatedly stressed the necessity of re-introducing the cameras on roads in Cyprus as an effective measure to prevent road-related deaths.

Road safety efforts have also been boosted by heavier fines that came into force on October 1 for speeding and other traffic violations.

Under the bills submitted to the House, there will be a 90-day window to deliver the fine to the registered owner of the vehicle and the driver, whose name will be given by the owner.

They also provide for procedures to be followed should the individual refuse to take receipt of the fine notification or denies having committed the offence.

A registered owner who refuses to take receipt of the fine and fails to pay it will be charged. Registered owners who say they were not driving the vehicle must inform authorities in writing within 15 days of receiving the fine and give the name of the driver. The 90-day time frame will then be renewed. Alternatively, proceedings will continue against the owner. Companies owning vehicles caught breaking the law will also be liable. This applies to the company itself as well as to its board members or managing directors.

If the out of court fine is not paid within 15 days from the day it is delivered, a penalty equal to half the fine will be added to the sum, to be paid in 15 days. Payment of fines will not accepted 30 days after the fine has been delivered and the case will go to court. Payment of the fine will automatically mean the driver accepts the penalty points on the driving licence cited on the notification. These will be imposed electronically.

In addition, the bills will allow private citizens so authorised to deliver fine notifications.

Source: Return of traffic cameras moving closer | Cyprus Mail

Police to start campaign on seatbelt use on Monday | Cyprus Mail

Police will start a two-week campaign on Monday checking that people are wearing seatbelts and children are using car seats as part of ongoing efforts to reduce the number of series and fatal injuries in traffic accidents.

The campaign will run until Sunday November 8.

The campaign aims to encourage the use of belts and car seats among drivers as a mindset.

Use of a seatbelt remains the most important safety measure in cars, police said.

According to police data, from 2017 to 2019, 55.56 per cent of drivers and passengers killed in traffic accidents were not wearing a seatbelt.

Source: Police to start campaign on seatbelt use on Monday | Cyprus Mail

Paphos clamping down on illegal parking

Paphos municipality said on Thursday it will be stepping up a campaign to stamp out illegal parking, taking special aim at those parked on pavements.

The municipality said traffic wardens will be carrying out strict checks with immediate fines being issued.

“To avoid unnecessary expenses and inconveniences, drivers are kindly requested to comply with the traffic code,” the announcement read.

Requests to cancel extrajudicial traffic fines will be rejected, AG’s office says | Cyprus Mail

The legal service said on Wednesday that all requests to cancel out extrajudicial traffic fines which became steeper and tougher on October 1, will not be accepted if such requests are outside the framework of the relevant legislation.

“Therefore, all extrajudicial fines should either be paid within the time limit provided by law or, if the complainant so wishes, be challenged before the court, whenever criminal proceedings are instituted for non-payment,” the legal service said in an announcement.

“In exceptional cases, if the complainants thinks that there is an obvious formal error in the issuance of the extrajudicial fine, they can also submit their complaint to the authorities, who, after evaluating it, will refer to the Attorney-general.

The announcement, however, specified that the submission of a request to the competent authorities does not cancel the deadline provided by the legislation for the payment of the fine.

Source: Requests to cancel extrajudicial traffic fines will be rejected, AG’s office says | Cyprus Mail

Driver fined €1,000 for speeding and not having car tax | Cyprus Mail

A 23-year-old man was fined €1,000 and had his licence suspended after he was found speeding during early morning hours on Wednesday.

Limassol district court fined the motorist €900 for speeding and an additional €100 for driving without car tax.

He also his driving licence suspended for a month.

Police arrested the driver a few minutes after midnight on Tuesday on Amathountas Avenue in Limassol. He was driving at 125 km/h on a street with a limit of 50 km/h.

Source: Driver fined €1,000 for speeding and not having car tax | Cyprus Mail