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RoSPA assesses older drivers for the ITV documentary-series ‘100 Year Old Driving School’

Press release

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

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RoSPA assesses older drivers for the ITV documentary-series 100 Year Old Driving School

RoSPA assessors will be supporting older drivers during an ITV documentary-series looking at why and how the elderly still get behind the wheel.

The three-part show, called 100 Year Old Driving School, will air on ITV tonight (Tuesday, September 12) and follows the lives of a group of British drivers, over the age of 90, who still enjoy driving on the roads.

They will be given assessments from some of the charity’s top examiners, providing hints, tips, encouragement and guidance on how they can improve their driving or whether it may be time to hang up their keys.

Kevin Clinton, RoSPA’s head of road safety, said: “Driving a car is an important part of personal, family and work life for millions of us, providing freedom and independence to get about as and when we need to.

“Experienced drivers are, in general, safer than those with less experience but as we get older, our health and fitness, often including our eyesight, physical condition and reaction times, begins to decline. Age-related conditions can also begin to affect our driving and can eventually mean that there is a point when an individual needs to give up driving. However, as this documentary will show, this point is different for everyone; there isn’t an age at which all drivers become unable to drive safely.

“Many older drivers recognise that their driving ability is changing and consequently change when and where they drive. Driving assessments, such as RoSPA’s Experienced Driver Assessment and refresher training courses can help older drivers.”

The documentary, produced by production company RDF Television, will also air on Tuesday, September 19 and 26.

For further information on older drivers, visit olderdrivers.org.uk

Police and public in red light tussle – Cyprus Mail

THE police have adamantly denied accusations from the public that drivers are being fined for offences they did not commit for the sake of meeting internal quotas, especially when conducting high-profile road safety campaigns.

In the space of one week last month, the Sunday Mail received complaints from several readers claiming they had been wrongly fined for traffic offences.

Two different men were fined in Germasogia, Limassol at two traffic lights close to each other for running a red light – charges they both deny.

One of them, Robert Michael, a 70-year-old retired British policeman who had worked in London, said he was absolutely perplexed by the fact he was fined when the light was very much green when he passed it.

“I braked as I approached the traffic lights just in case they would go amber but they were still green. I continued to drive on and a policeman pulled me over to say I had passed with a red light,” he told the Sunday Mail.

“I’m an ex policeman from London. I don’t break the law. If it was justified I certainly wouldn’t dispute it.”

An old photograph of Robert Michael who was involved in the security of former President Demetris Christofias when he visited the UK

Michael said he began disputing the case with the police officer on scene and when Michael told him he was willing to take the case to court, the officer allegedly responded with “you can try but we always win.”

Cases such as these are always very difficult to prove or dispute.

Unlike London, which is covered with cameras and CCTV, in Cyprus a court case would be the word of one man against that of an officer.

“In the UK I would have a shot at justice but not in this country,” Fields said.

“I had children in the car, so of course I was driving carefully.”

On the same day, a friend of Fields, Egis Rukviza also got stopped at a nearby set of traffic lights in Germasogia for what he was told at the scene was running a red light.

Rukviza has been living in Cyprus with his wife Neringa for the past seven years after they moved from Lithuania and says in all his time here he had never once been fined.

Due to Rukviza’s broken English, his wife spoke on his behalf to the Sunday Mail “my husband stopped at the traffic lights because it was red and there was another car in front of him. Then it became green and they drove on. Police didn’t stop the first car. It was an expensive one, so they didn’t bother, but they stopped my husband.

“I know my husband, he drives very carefully,” Neringa said.

According to their account, once pulled over, the police officer called on a colleague of his – who was sitting in the car – to write up the fine.

“He didn’t even see what happened. My husband kept insisting it was green,” she said.

Later that evening, the couple went to the police station to complain and ask for proof of the offence – they were told there were no CCTV cameras.

Police spokesman Andreas Angelides said the difficulty with such complaints is that there is hardly ever any evidence – unlike those that are caught speeding with the use of a radar – and it was the word of one person against another.

“We also have to keep in mind that the person being fined might be overreacting,” and perhaps falsely denying the charge, Angelides told the Sunday Mail.

Police’s campaigns are aimed to clamp down on bad drivers not an attempt to give out tickets left, right and centre, he added.

On August 29, in a one-day campaign, 259 people were booked in Limassol alone between 8am to 5pm.

Of those, 78 were booked running a red light while 82 were caught using a mobile phone while driving.

“I don’t mind these campaigns. I think they’re great. But you can’t fine innocent people as a source of income,” Michael said.

There are three courses of action available for people to follow when they feel they have been wronged – send a letter to the chief of police, take the case to court, or speak to the local traffic police supervisor.

If there is a case of bad police behaviour, then the public can also file a report to the independent authority for the investigation of allegations and complaints against the police.

Michael and Rukviza however tried – and were rebuffed twice – when they tried to speak to Limassol traffic police, they said.

After they discovered they had both been fined, they headed to the Germasogia police station asking to speak to the traffic supervisor. They were advised to go the next day.

The following day however the supervisor was apparently still unavailable to meet them and sent out the police officer that fined Rukviza.

Upon closer inspection Rukviza also realised that although his supposed offence was running a red light, the ticket said he had been driving while on his phone – an offence he also denies.

“The officer, when he came out to meet my husband and Mr Robert (Michael) at the station, then insisted they had driven past a red light,” Neringa said.

“So they asked him why the ticket was for driving while using a mobile phone and he said ‘you committed both but I fined you only for one’.”

Rukviza was considering filing a report over the police officer but said “they all work together. I don’t think a complaint would even make it to the policeman’s file. I doubt they even have a file.”

Angelides told the Sunday Mail that under no circumstances do police have quotas of fines that have to be filled.

“On the contrary, officers are told that if they’re not sure about an offence – say someone was caught for speeding but they weren’t sure if the person was wearing a seatbelt – then to ignore the seatbelt offence,” he said.

“Over the years, the behaviour of the police force has improved as well and the way they respond to the public. Many times the officers are on the receiving end of abuse from people that are upset about being fined who start shouting and swearing.”

All of which is no doubt true, but is of little solace to Michael and Rukviza. Both men paid their €85 fines, but feel it is unjust, as they insist they didn’t commit the offences.

“If I’d done it, of course I’d pay,” Fields said.

[…]

Source: Police and public in red light tussle – Cyprus Mail

Electric cars not as clean as they seem – Cyprus Mail

The electricity authority proudly announced in August that they have purchased six electric cars in a bid to reduce carbon emissions.

And at a first look the numbers are indeed impressive. According to information by the authority, the six cars save 3,096 litres of liquid fuel per year, and emissions drop by 5.52 tonnes.

The engineers explained how they calculated this amount, and it makes sense. It turns out, however, that one crucial calculation is missing – how many carbon emissions it takes to produce the energy required for charging the six electric vehicles, which are powered through the main grid.

Their analysis is specific as far as it goes. The engineers didn’t just compare their new cars to any average car, but to petrol cars similar to the Nissan leaf model and Ford Fiestas, which are also new. They also took into account how many kilometres the average car belonging to the company travels per year.

This helps when calculating the savings in petrol. Comparing the electric cars to the Ford Fiesta 1.5 saloon which uses 5.16 litres per 100 kilometres, they estimated an average car in their possession travels around 10,000 kilometres, meaning the six cars have indeed a saving of 3.096 litres.

The emissions can also be calculated. The CO2 emissions of the Ford Fiesta are 92 grammes per kilometre, which are multiplied by the amount of kilometres and the number of vehicles, thus adding up to 5.52 tonnes per year.

So far, so good. But those six electric cars need charging and that takes electricity, and Cyprus’ electricity is largely powered by oil and oil means high carbon emissions.

When one considers the amount of carbon emissions for 2016, which the authority says is 0.00074 tonnes per kW/h, an engineer and expert in renewable energy sources came up with the figure of 6.669 tonnes per year for the 10,000 kilometres of travel. And that is way more than the emissions saved by the purchase of the new cars in a year.

According to the electricity authority, however, this last calculation is not that easy to make. “Every day our transmissions operator decides on a different combination of energy sources, and the amount of crude oil, renewables and gas oil varies,” spokeswoman of the EAC Christina Papadopoulou said, “how can somebody calculate the amount?”

The company also pointed out that its engineers have calculated the saving of emissions using the example of new cars. Older models emit more than the 92 grammes used for the calculations, thus the savings may well be more than 5.52 tonnes.

According to EAC engineer, Marios Papouttis, the emissions for the electricity generation will get less over time. While only 9 per cent of electricity is currently produced by renewable energy sources, this this percentage will increase considerably in the future.

Even having this in mind, electric cars are certainly not yet those wonderfully clean machines so often claimed in many countries where they tend to be hailed as the answer to all that is bad about cars.

As EAC chairman Andreas Marangos said when announcing the acquisition of the authority’s electric cars, increasing their numbers is an international trend. In Europe, he said, France and the UK have already announced timeframes concerning the exclusive use of electric cars.[…]

Source: Electric cars not as clean as they seem – Cyprus Mail

Motorcyclist critical after Coral Bay crash – in-cyprus.com

A 32-year-old man from Paphos is fighting for his life after the motorbike he was riding collided head-on with a car at Coral Bay in Peyia late on Sunday night.

The incident – which comes around 24 hours after another 25-year-old motorcyclist from nearby Geroskipou was killed after losing control of his bike – is currently being looked into by traffic police in Paphos.

According to witnesses, the 32-year-old suffered life-threatening injuries after being struck by a car which had been overtaking another vehicle at the time and had gone into the opposite lane. The car was being driven by a 21-year-old Romanian man.

The rider of the motorbike, who was not wearing a crash helmet, was rushed to Paphos General Hospital before he was transferred to Nicosia General Hospital due to the seriousness of his injuries.

He is currently in intensive care after suffering serious brain trauma and internal bleeding.

Doctors say his condition is critical.

Source: Motorcyclist critical after Coral Bay crash – in-cyprus.com

Cops in seat belt and child safety seat clampdown – in-cyprus.com

Traffic police across Cyprus will be conducting a nationwide clampdown on motorists and vehicle passengers without seat belts this week.

Apart from seat belt checks, police will also be looking to see if children are properly seated in child seats.

The campaign – which is part of a wider European initiative by the European Traffic Police Network (TISPOL) – will run until September 17 across the island.

The aim of the campaign is lower the risk of injuries and road fatalities by motorists and passengers not using seat belts. Officers will also be checking to see if children are properly fastened inside the cars.

According to police figures, 62.6% of road fatalities were due to drivers and passengers not being properly fastened.

Source: Cops in seat belt and child safety seat clampdown – in-cyprus.com

Man of 72 caught driving 216km/h – in-cyprus.com

72-year-old man has been arrested by police after he was clocked doing a staggering 216km/h on the motorway close to Larnaca Airport on Sunday afternoon.

Traffic police pulled over the motorist after the radar recorded his car tearing down the Kalo Chorio-Larnaca Airport motorway at a speed of 216km/h. A 72-year-old man from Nicosia was placed under arrested and taken to Kiti Police Station where he was formally charged.

The driver, who had been drinking, is set to appear before a Larnaca magistrate at a later date.

Source: Man of 72 caught driving 216km/h – in-cyprus.com

Cyprus to introduce stricter criteria for older drivers – in-cyprus.com

The Law Office of the Republic is looking over proposed legislation on the tests drivers aged over 70 will need to undergo to be allowed to stay on the road.

Speaking to ACTIVE radio on Friday, Communications Minister Marios Demetriades said the proposed legislation included more frequent checks to ensure elderly drivers fulfilled a

The proposal has become even more timely, the minister noted, in light of Thursday’s hit-and-run incident which has seen a 76-year-old man remanded in custody on suspicion of hitting a cyclist and fleeing the scene. The cyclist, 33-year-old Panagiotis Hadjinikolas from Zakaki, was killed.

The House, Demetriades also revealed is, in addition, reviewing another law on cyclists.

This legislation, he said, aimed to better protect cyclists while also setting out exactly how they should behave on the road.

“This legislation was submitted to the House months ago,” Demetriades said, adding he believed it should be approved as soon as possible “to be able to provide cyclist safety through the law”.

number of criteria.

 

Source: Cyprus to introduce stricter criteria for older drivers – in-cyprus.com

Four day remand for fatal hit-and-run suspect – in-cyprus.com

The Limassol Court on Friday remanded a pensioner suspected of being the driver in a hit-and-run accident that left a cyclist dead in custody for four days.

According to the police, the vehicle was tracked down and its 76-year-old driver, a Greek Cypriot man, arrested on Thursday. The car, a double-cabin truck, is undergoing tests to confirm it is the same one that hit cyclist Panagiotis Hadjinikolas, 33, from Zakaki.

Hadjinikolas was hit by a car as he was cycling on the main Kantou-Platres road on Thursday. The vehicle’s driver then sped off.

The cyclist’s body was discovered by another motorist at around 6am on Thursday morning.

 

Source: Four day remand for fatal hit-and-run suspect – in-cyprus.com

Cyprus LPG prices way above EU average – Cyprus Mail

Prices of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are 43 per cent higher in Cyprus than in other EU countries, the House commerce committee heard on Tuesday, only a month after supply became available to the local market.

While EU average prices are €0.55 per litre, the selling price in Cyprus is €0.78 per litre, head of the consumers union Loucas Aristodimou said during the session

Currently, two stations offer LPG, both of which are based in Nicosia and began supplying last month, MPs heard.

 Disy MP Andreas Kyprianou said around 350 vehicles currently use LPG as fuel

[…]

Source: Cyprus LPG prices way above EU average – Cyprus Mail

Motorcyclist dies in accident that leaves his bike in two pieces – Cyprus Mail

A man died early on Thursday morning after an accident which left his motorbike cut in two.
The fatal accident happened shortly after midnight when Dimitris Alexander Mannardak, 25, a resident of Geroskipou, was driving from Geroskipou to Paphos.

At some point he lost control of the bike and collided with a dividing strip on the road to his right. The motorcycle overturned, rolled onto the asphalt and ended up on a roundabout before coming to a stop.

Due to the severity of the crash the vehicle was cut into two.

The 25-year-old driver who was wearing a helmet was initially conscious. He was taken by ambulance to Paphos general hospital where he was diagnosed with multiple fractures and internal bleeding.

Despite having surgery he died at 3.16am.

Police are investigating the cause of the accident.

[…]

Source: Motorcyclist dies in accident that leaves his bike in two pieces – Cyprus Mail